Contact Information

Stephanie Lung Lock Man
 
Ph.D. student
 
School/Applied Child Psychology
 
McGill University
 

Research Interests

My research interests are to explore ways to predict and characterize repetitive behaviours of autism, and to understand the impact of repetitive behaviours on academic outcomes. As repetitive behaviours are considerably difficult to manage at home and at school, and are amongst the predictors of long-term adaptive functioning, I hope to determine early markers for characterizing the repetitive behaviours of school-aged children with autism and evaluate the impact of behaviours on learning and academic achievement. 

Keywords:

repetitive behaviours, sensory patterns, cognitive flexibility, learning, school learning.
 

Publications

Journal Articles

  • Lung, S (2018).Evidence-Based Practice and Practice-Based Evidence in School Psychology. NASP Communiqué, 47(1), 8-9.
  • Lung, S., Lee, E., Chen, E., Chan, S., Chang, W.C., Hui, C. (2018). Prevalence and Correlates of Antipsychotic Polypharmacy in Hong Kong. Asian Journal of Psychiatry, 33, DOI:10.1016/j.ajp.2018.03.012

Conference Presentations

  • Lung, S.L.M., & Bertone, A. (2018, November). Nonverbal strength without verbal weaknesses: Cognitive analysis of intellectually impaired adolescents with autism. Poster session presented at the Neuroscience Research Center of the Université du Québec à Montréal (NeuroQAM) Conference, Montréal, Canada.
  • Lung, S.L.M., & Bertone, A. (2018, October). Is perseveration a reliable marker of autism? Poster session presented at the Transforming Autism Care Consortium, Montréal, Canada.
  • Lung, S.L.M., Oh, H.J.J., & Bertone, A. (2018, May). Specificity of atypical sensory behaviors in autism – Examination of intellectually impaired adolescents with and without autism. Poster session presented at the McGill Summer Institute for School Psychology Conference, Montréal, Canada.
  • Lung, S.L.M., & Bertone, A. (2018, March). How do sensory patterns and cognitive flexibility contribute to the restricted, repetitive behaviors in school-aged children with autism? Oral session presented at the McGill Education Graduate Student Society Conference, Montréal, Canada.